Resurrection

From World of Charun

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Finding powerful priests who are able to bring back the dead is a daunting and nearly impossible task. Thus the majority who die stay dead. However, legends say that at times ancient scrolls can be found in the deepest and darkest corners of Charun that are able to revive a fallen camrade.

There are other ways of escaping the cold grasp of Gesanis though. Fate can interfere and leave characters for dead, rather than actually killed. More about this can be read under the section detailing death.


Resurrection Spell

Would a resurrection spell be cast it will punish both the revived one's and the caster's physique severly. It is impossible to know beforehand the hardships associated with each ritual. What is known is that both the revived one and the caster will share the endeavour and suffer from it.

The resurrection ritual can be performed in two ways; With an existing dead corpse and without one:

With a Corpse:
Any remains count as a corpse, be they skeletal or crushed to pieces. However, the head has to be present (regardless of state), as does atleast 25% of the rest of the body. Otherwise the ritual will count as being performed without a corpse.

  • The resurrected one will lose 1d6+2 of his Constitution score permanently, since the ritual can not fully create the mortal body to it's original strength. Would this bring the Constitution to Zero or below, it will be considered a failure where the physical body is too weak to manage the ritual. If so happens, there will be a risk that the soul will remain in the mortal world as a ghost.
  • The resurrected one will begin the game with 2 Fate Points, regardless of the amount possessed at the time of death.
  • The caster's pysique will also suffer from channeling such utterly powerful energies, losing half of the resurrected one's rolled Con penalty permanently. However, a successful Fortitude save DC 20 will further halve (rounded up) the Con penalty to one quarter to that of the resurrected one's.


Without a Corpse:
If the remains are lacking, or entirely missing, the ritual will have more severe consequences.

  • The person conducting the resurrection has to know the dead person's full name, nationality, race and time of death.
  • The dead person will have to agree on being brought back.
  • Without a corpse the soul will be drawn to the mortal world and begin a process of materialising. The new, physical body will take on the appearence and age of the time the person was killed. It will, however, be considerably weakened.
  • The resurrected one will lose 1d6+2 of his Constitution score permanently, since the ritual can not fully create the mortal body to it's original strength. Would this bring the Constitution to Zero or below, it will be considered a failure where the physical body is too weak to manage the ritual. If so happens, there will be a risk that the soul will remain in the mortal world as a ghost.
  • The resurrected one will lose 2d3+2 levels permanently, since the ritual can not fully recreate the mortal body. The levels can not be brought down more than 75%, with a minimum of 2.
  • The resurrected one will begin the game with 2 Fate Points, regardless of the amount possessed at the time of death.
  • The caster's pysique will also suffer from channeling such utterly powerful energies, losing half of the resurrected one's rolled Con penalty permanently. However, a successful Fortitude save will further halve the Con penalty to one quarter to that of the resurrected one's.

Needless to say, the few who are powerful enough to resurrect the dead do so very rarely, due the strain on one's physique is considerable.

More about: Death

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